Five Vintage Tracks To Hear This Week: 23-06-20

In my two years of running Old Time Review, I have listened to hundreds of tracks from yesteryear, writing about new products that feature them. Many music fans will note that it is easier than ever to discover new old music, thanks to the rise of Spotify and other services. In this weekly section, I will recommend five vintage tracks that I have discovered this week!

In no Particular order, here are this week’s picks.

5. I Pretend I’m With You By The Searchers

Chris Curtis wrote this catchy number, which was first recorded by British band The Searchers in 1964; Released as the B-Side to ‘Don’t Through Your Love Away’. I love the juxtaposition of the verse and the chorus, turning quite a simple effort into something more complex. Using reverb on most of the instruments really brings things to life, without making things sound eery. It’ll be some time before I stop humming this tune.

4. The Sunshine Man by Curtis Mac

If you’re looking for a summer tune to start your day, look no further! Taken from his 1968 album of the same name, this two-minute wonder sees Rockabilly artist Curtis take on a more Country orientated sound. His joyful vocals accompanied by a sixties backing are a real tonic. Many will remember ‘Grandaddy’s Rockin’ and ‘If I Had Me A Woman’ as his signature songs, but I must admit to preferring the material from his Country era in the late 1960s.

3. Love’s Made A Fool Of You by The Bobby Fuller Four

Bobby Fuller’s energetic reinvention of this great Buddy Holly composition is one of my favourite things right now. He turns the song upside down, plays with harmonies and makes you want to tap your feet. This version was first released in 1966 as a follow up to their cover of ‘I Fought The Law’. There are many covers of this track, and I rate this as one of the best.

2. Blue Moon Of Kentucky By Colin Hicks.

An often covered song, this time from the brother of Tommy Steele! I was writing a review of a new Colin Hicks compilation from Bear Family Records when this track caught my attention. His interpretation was first released in 1960 as a B-Side. I have to admit; it was the snazzy little guitar riff that really sold this version, along with his youthful vocals.

1. I’m Through by Sleepy LaBeef

I’m no stranger to the work of Sleepy LaBeef, as I am a major fan of his Country output produced with Columbia records. His debut, I’m Through, was issued on Starday Records in 1957; It is simple but it rocks! From the moment those two addictive guitar patterns blast through the speakers, I can’t help but bop along. The combination of the music and LaBeef’s vocals are like Cash meets Presley, and it works perfectly. I have often neglected LaBeef’s Rockabilly output. Maybe it’s time to take notice.

Jamie Dyer

Jamie Dyer is an experienced writer, broadcaster, musician and social media marketer. He enjoys Old Time Radio, vintage TV, collecting vinyl and supporting the New York Knicks.

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